Monthly Archives: February 2014

Online Traffic School

Traffic course allows you to dismiss a traffic ticket and meet a court-ordered requirement. This will also allow you to reduce points from your driving record, or even earn an insurance discount! This course will help you to learn all of the essential traffic laws and regulations that pertain to California state, along with essential defensive driving techniques designed to help you prevent traffic violation or mishaps before they even occur. Even if you’re voluntarily taking a course to lower your insurance or points, or you’ve been asked by the court or DMV to attend traffic school, our California state approved traffic school will meet your requirements without any hassle.

Online Traffic Course, Eligibility & Requirements !!!!!!

Online traffic school is not intended for training students to obtain the deriving license. Traffic School 2 U  course has been reviewed and approved to meet the requirements for the traffic violator school program. This Traffic course allows you to dismiss a traffic ticket and meet a court-ordered requirement.

Eligibility:

Pursuant to Vehicle Code section 1808.7, the following situations are not eligible for masking a traffic safety violation on a California driver record:

  1. The driver has already attended a traffic violator course within 18 months of the conviction.
  2. The driver holds a commercial license as defined in Vehicle Code section 15210.
  3. The driver holds a commercial driver license from out of state.
  4. The violation occurred in a commercial motor vehicle as defined in Vehicle Code section 15210.
  5. The violator has not paid a deposit of fees or bail, and has not pleaded guilty, no contest, or been convicted by the court of jurisdiction.
  6. The conviction would result in a violation point count of more than one point pursuant to Vehicle Code section 12810.
    A list of Vehicle Code two point violations may be found on the Department of Motor Vehicles web site, www.dmv.ca.gov.
Requirements for Completion of Traffic school Online:

This site will require your California driver license or California identification number, or, if you do not have a California driver license or California identification card, your birth date, the court reference number (docket, ticket or citation number) and the court code. These are requirements for receiving a completion receipt and to have the information sent to the court of jurisdiction should you successfully pass this course. If you are unable to provide the required information, your participation shall not be credited toward satisfying the requirement.

Cost of Traffic Tickets in California

State records show that traffic citation fines have skyrocketed over the last decade, with some common infractions now costing close to $500.

Credit: Noah Berger/For The Center for Investigative Reporting

Motorist Derick Neal doesn’t remember the April night when he rolled through a right turn at a red light in San Leandro, Calif.

The video from the red-light camera clearly shows the violation, he admits. Nevertheless, the 40-year-old software engineer is outraged about the price of the ticket: $490, plus an additional $59 for traffic school.

“It’s one thing if I was barreling through, but you can see my brake lights all the way through,” he said after viewing the video. “I expected it to be $100, $150 at most for the infraction.”

Like Neal, many of the more than 6 million California drivers who get tickets each year experience sticker shock. State records show that traffic citation fines have skyrocketed over the last decade, with some common infractions now costing close to $500.

DERICK NEAL’S TICKET

 

Base fine
$100
State penalty assessment
$100
County penalty assessment
$70
DNA identification fund
$50
Court construction
$50
State surcharge
$20
Emergency medical services
$20
Emergency medical air transportation
$4
Court operations
$40
Conviction assessment
$35
Night court
$1
TOTAL TICKET
$490
Traffic school
$59
TOTAL COST
$549

Running a red light, currently $490, cost $340 in 2003 and $103 in 1993, according to the Judicial Council of California, which sets the base fines for traffic offenses. A ticket for rolling through a stop sign costs $238; a decade ago, it was $130. Speeding up to 15 mph over the limit also comes with a $238 price tag ‒ more than eight times what it cost in 1993. And traffic school can add $60.

Oddly, the base fine for most violations has remained the same for the last 20 years. The growth in fines is due to add-ons known as penalty assessments, which are set by the Legislature. These fees are tacked on to citations, with the money earmarked for projects ranging from court construction to DNA research for solving crimes.

Viewed separately, each assessment might not seem particularly onerous, but the penalties add up. About a decade ago, there was one penalty assessment. Now, there are 10 – and total fines average four or five times the amount of the base fine.

The soaring fines don’t seem to have encouraged Californians to become better drivers. Each year, between 26 and 30 percent of drivers get a traffic citation, records show. But the high price of a ticket has led many traffic offenders to plead not guilty and contest their tickets in court, hoping to have them dismissed or reduced.

In 2003, about 196,000 traffic citations were disputed in California courts, according to Judicial Council statistics. That was 4.5 percent of the total issued. By 2011, that number had nearly doubled to 383,000, 7.1 percent of all the citations issued.

Advocates say the increased fines are especially hard on the working class.

“If you’re a single parent barely making it, one of those (red-light) tickets could really set you back,” said Shane Gusman, legislative representative for the California Teamsters union. “I think folks are doing the math and hoping that it will get dismissed if the officer doesn’t show up. I know our drivers are doing that calculation.”

Some traffic court judges offer community service, rather than fines, to those who plead guilty. Gusman says this isn’t much help for many people. At the community service rate of $10 an hour, it would take 49 hours to pay off a red-light violation ticket.

The courts don’t track whether they are losing revenue because more motorists are fighting their tickets. But some courts around the state are struggling to handle the influx of people contesting tickets.

Trial dates are backed up in San Diego County, where the number of motorists contesting tickets has doubled in a decade, said court spokeswoman Karen Dalton. The current wait is six months.

Those accused of traffic violations in Los Angeles County have been facing waits of nine months or more for a hearing, said court spokeswoman Mary Hearn. But it’s about to get worse. Recently, courts underwent their third round of layoffs in four years.

“With the changes our court was forced to make in the past few months, I expect those numbers will again increase dramatically,” Hearn said.

Derick Neal pleaded not guilty on his red-light violation and went to court in Oakland this month. He was found guilty and must pay the full fine.

Some courts offer discounts to motorists who plead guilty rather than fight their tickets. At the San Francisco Hall of Justice on a recent day, a court officer offered deals to about 80 people who had shown up to dispute their tickets. Motorists could pay $285 to settle any ticket of $400 or more, the officer said, and tickets of less than $400 could be settled for $178. If motorists went to trial and lost, they would pay the full fine, the officer warned.

But there was no such clemency across the bay in Oakland at the Wiley W. Manuel Courthouse, where Commissioner Taylor Culver reigns over his courtroom with sarcastic humor. During a red-light camera trial on a recent afternoon, when one defendant asked for a reduction in his fine, Culver boomed, “Nobody here is special or better than anybody. There’s nobody here special but me.”

In another case, Culver cut off a defendant’s comments by saying, “Just tell me about the money. How are you going to pay?”

Experts say there is little chance that the penalty assessments will stop increasing because it’s an attractive source of revenue for state and county governments. A 2006 report by the California Research Bureau, which studies issues for the governor and Legislature, estimated that traffic violations bring in more than $500 million per year.

“I don’t know we’ll ever have a rollback unless the state had enough money in the general fund,” said Gregory Pagan, chief counsel for the Assembly Public Safety Committee. “It’s an easy way to find a revenue stream to fund (a program). They’ll never stop.”

 

Source: Judicial Council of California

 

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that the Judicial Council of California sets base fines for traffic offenses, while the Legislature sets penalty assessments.

 

Courtesy of http://cironline.org/:

http://cironline.org/reports/california-drives-traffic-fines-fees-earmarked-projects-5223

Trafficschoolonline

Traffic Tickets & Traffic Schools in California

  • In California, as a licensed driver you can attend a traffic school once every eighteen months. If you opt to attend traffic school, you pay the regular court fine plus a traffic school fee.
  • Traffic school is an eight-hour course. All California courts also accept a traffic school offered on the Internet. Your insurance company will not find out about your ticket and the DMV will not access a point against your license.
  • If you are charged with a two-point violation, you will not be eligible for traffic school. Reckless Driving (23103 VC), Exhibition of Speed (23109 VC), driving at 100 mph (22348 VC) are examples of two point violations.
  • A charge of Reckless Driving and Exhibition of Speed may be charged as a misdemeanor instead of an infraction. Misdemeanors carry more serious consequences.
  • Insurance companies may choose not to increase your premiums if you only have one point against you within the prior12-month period. Be sure to check with your insurance company.

DMV Reminds Motorists of New 2014 Laws

DMV Reminds Motorists of New 2014 Laws .

SACRAMENTO — With 2014 just around the corner, the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) is reminding motorists of some of the new laws that will become effective in the new year. The following laws go into effect on January 1, 2014, unless otherwise noted.

Bicycles: Passing Distance. AB 1371 (Bradford), known as the Three Feet for Safety Act, will require a motor vehicle driver passing a bicycle that is proceeding in the same direction to pass with no less than 3 feet between any part of the vehicle and any part of the bicycle or driver. When three feet is not possible, the motor vehicle must slow to a reasonable and prudent speed and only pass when no danger is present to the bicyclist. Failing to do so can incur a fine, regardless of a collision or not. This law will take effect September 16, 2014.

Clean Air Vehicle Decals / “HOV Stickers.” AB 266 (Yee) and SB 286 (Blumenfield), together extend sunset dates for low emission, zero emission vehicles to operate in high occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV) without meeting occupancy requirements to January 1, 2019.

Commercial Driver’s License. AB 1047 (Linder) will allow the DMV to conduct the commercial drive test for the holder of an out–of–state commercial learner’s permit. The department would electronically transfer the information to the motor vehicle department in the applicant’s state of residence. AB 1047 also modifies the license class definitions to require a driver operating a bus weighing more than 26,000 pounds to hold a commercial Class B license and a driver operating a bus weighing 26,000 pounds or less to hold a commercial Class C license.

DMV Vehicle Registration Pilot Program. SB 806 (Hueso) authorizes DMV to establish a pilot program to evaluate the use of alternatives to stickers, tabs, license plates, and registration cards, subject to certain requirements. It will also enable the DMV to experiment with electronic license plates, as well as facilitate DMV’s ability to explore cost–effective alternatives to California’s traditional metal license plate, plastic–coated registration stickers, and paper registration cards.

Registration and Vehicle Transfers Between Family Members. AB 443 (Lowenthal) prohibits the transfer of ownership of a vehicle to a relative or a revocable living trust until all parking or toll–violation fines and penalties reported to the DMV are paid by the transferee.

Teen Drivers. SB 194 (Galgiani) will prohibit a person who is under 18 years of age from using an electronic wireless communications device to write, send, or read a text–based communication while driving, even if it is equipped with a hands–free device.

Veterans License Plates. AB 244 (Bonilla) Requires the California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVet) to sponsor a veterans’ special interest license plate and requires the DMV to issue the veterans’ plate if CalVet meets the current statutory requirements. This law creates, in addition to the current Honoring Veterans design of the Veteran’s Organization Plate, a new program to reissue the Veteran design that was issued prior to January 1, 2010. These plates are available to all vehicle owners. The Department of Veterans Affairs must secure 7,500 pre–paid applications in order for the department to implement this plate program.

Additionally, the Department of Motor Vehicles will begin the process of implementing AB 60 (Alejo)—the new law requiring DMV to issue a driver license to an applicant who is unable to submit satisfactory proof that he/she is legally present in the Unites States —by drafting new regulations and preparing field offices to process new applications. The new law becomes operative by January 1, 2015. The applicant will be required to meet all other driver license qualifications.

For complete information on chaptered bills enacted in 2013, please refer to the Legislative Counsel website at www.LegInfo.ca.gov.

Save Time, Go Online! Doing business with the DMV has never been easier. The DMV offers an array of services to customers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week through its Website including online advance appointments for written and drive tests; vehicle registration and driver license renewals, selection of personalized license plates, changes of address and payment of fees via secure debit transactions. Customers can also effect transactions by calling DMV customer service at (800) 777–0133. DMV is a department under the California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA).

Courtesy of DMV:

https://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/newsrel/newsrel13/2013_41.htm

TrafficSchool2U.com! – An Online Traffic School